Live & Learn

The most open book you'll read! Ask away.   My name is Caitlin and these are the things I like.

elsa-frozemyheart:

kristoff-themountainman:

briannathestrange:

Elsa be lookin like she gonna engage in a rap battle or somethin

image

 #YO YO YO LET IT GO

I still laugh every time I see this post.

(via folded-pages)

— 2 weeks ago with 44750 notes
strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

(via bettywhitefanfiction)

— 2 weeks ago with 81398 notes

"I don’t care if we on the run, baby, as long as I’m next to you. And if loving you is a crime, tell me why do I bring out the best in you?"

Happy 6th Anniversary Bey and Jay!

(Source: thequeenbey, via bettywhitefanfiction)

— 2 weeks ago with 5282 notes

tommarvalo:

harry potter and the prisoner of azkaban

(via endchesters)

— 2 weeks ago with 1737 notes

La Grande Tapisserie (The Great Tapestry) by Julien des Monstiers, 2013.

(Source: noiseman, via vincecarters)

— 2 weeks ago with 28271 notes

nprbooks:

In Wes Anderson’s latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It’s about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there’s a credit at the end that reads: “Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig.”

Last month, Anderson told Fresh Air's Terry Gross that until a few years ago, he had never heard of Zweig — and he's not alone. Many moviegoers share Anderson's past ignorance of the man who was once one of the world's most famous and most translated authors.

George Prochnik is out to change that. His forthcoming book is called The Impossible Exile: Stefan Zweig at the End of the World. Check out his conversation with NPR’s Robert Siegel here.

(via nprfreshair)

— 2 weeks ago with 1401 notes